The lettering, recessed background, wheat stalks and cut-outs were done on a MultiCam router using Enroute software. The sign is a 24-by-30-in. panel of 2-in. mahogany with The Silo and the banner at the bottom cut from 1-in. mahogany panels. The barn, banner and beer mugs are hand carved and hand painted. It’s finished with acrylic latex paints, artists acrylics, satin clear coat and 23K gold leaf. David Hassan, Hassan Sign Co., Cohassett, Massachusetts
Wine & Spirits and logo were router-cut from 1½-in. HDU board on a MultiCam router using Enroute software. A Taste For was cut from ¾-in. PVC board. The background is a 32-in.-by-12-ft. panel of ¾-in. overlaid plywood panel with red overlaid plywood tabs behind, with edges filled and sealed with epoxy, finished with acrylic latex paints. David Hassan, Hassan Sign Co., Cohassett, Massachusetts
The letters were CNC routed from Corafoam HDU hand-painted details on 131-by-29-in. HDU panel with a carved border. The graphics are carved and hand painted. It is finished with Jay Cooke’s Sign Primer and acrylic latex paints. Manfred Didier and Marcus Goebels, Timber Signs, Ofterschwang, Germany
This 1½-in. HDU panel was carved on a ShopBot CNC router using Vectric V Carve software. It was finished with 1 Shot enamel with 23K gold leaf on the letters. The lobster and banner were hand carved. John Liptak, Liptak Signs, Portsmouth, Rhode Island
The router-cut HDU letters were sandblasted, then gilded and mounted on the router-cut and carved 63-by-31-in. HDU panel with an airbrush fade background. The outlines and borders were hand painted, and the incise carved letters are gilded. It is finished with Jay Cooke’s Sign Primer and acrylic latex paints. Manfred Didier and Marcus Goebels, Timber Signs, Ofterschwang, Germany
The router-cut HDU letters were sandblasted, then gilded and mounted on the router-cut and carved 63-by-31-in. HDU panel with an airbrush fade background. The outlines and borders were hand painted, and the incise carved letters are gilded. It is finished with Jay Cooke’s Sign Primer and acrylic latex paints. Manfred Didier and Marcus Goebels, Timber Signs, Ofterschwang, Germany
The lettering was cut and carved from 1-in. HDU board on a MultiCam router using Enroute software with the outline recessed and letters prism carved. The panel is two layers of 1½-in. HDU with the back routed out to accept a piece of ½-in. MDO and 1½-in. mahogany side pieces to accept the brackets. The address oval is 1½-in. HDU board, routed round-faced with prismatic numerals. The book is hand carved. The sign is finished with acrylic latex paints, artists acrylics and 23K gold leaf. David Hassan, Hassan Sign Co., Cohassett, Massachusetts
Gilded prismatic HDU letters on a 66-by-49-in. HDU panel. The carved, gilded lion is on a smalts background, and the sign is hung on a custom-made galvanized iron bracket. It is finished with Jay Cooke’s Sign Primer and acrylic latex paints. Manfred Didier and Marcus Goebels, Timber Signs, Ofterschwang, Germany
This isn’t a piece of vintage factory equipment found in a junkyard. It was built by Jim Dawson, Synergy Sign & Graphics, Strasburg, Ohio, as a creative project using his CNC router. “Our first project after attending Dan Sawatzky’s Sign Magic workshop,” says Jim, “was an over-the-top two-piece gear set with a chain that drove the mechanism. The gears were designed using Enroute Pro 6 CNC software then milled from 2-in.-thick 30-lb. Precision Board HDU on our Multicam CNC. The gears were milled in halves, then glued together.”
Letters cut on an Industrial CNC router and mounted on standoffs by Custom Grafix Ltd., San Fernando, Trinidad, West Indies
The ¾-in. HDU letters and ¾-in. PVC panel were cut on a ShopBot CNC router using Vectric VCarve Pro software. The panel is framed and has a stained glass inset. Letters are finished with 23k gold leaf on black smalts background. John Liptak, Liptak Signs, Portsmouth, Rhode Island

CNC routers deliver head-turning signage

By SignCraft Magazine

Posted on Monday, October 30th, 2017

Sourcelist

These companies offer products for CNC sign production and reach sign pros through SignCraft:

CNC equipment
AXYZ
www.axyz.com

Gerber Scientific Products
www.gspinc.com

Industrial CNC
www.industrialcnc.com

MultiCam
www.multicam.com

ShopBot
www.shopbottools.com

Vision Engraving & Routing Systems
www.visionengravers.com

CadCam software

ArtCAM
www.artcam.com

Artclip 3D
www.artclip3d.com

Gerber Scientific Products
www.gspinc.com

Vectric
www.vectric.com

Enroute
www.enroutesoftware.com

Type 3/TypeEdit
www.type3.com

Clip art and Textures:

Vector Art 3D Clip Art:
www.vectorart3d.com

Dan Sawatzky’s Texture Magic:
www.signcraft.com
“My CNC router is probably one of the best investments I’ve made,” says Brad Getter, Megagraphics, Eureka, California. “A router will let you make $1800 on a sheet of material rather than $300.”

It’s true: CNC routing opens the door to more profitable 3D signage. 3D signs command a higher price because they deliver more advertising and image-building value to the customer. And that delivers profits to a sign shop’s bottom line.

There’s never been more competition for the viewer’s attention, so taking advantage of 3D to add appeal to a sign makes great sense. It helps set a sign apart in the sea of flat, rectangular signs. This is an obvious fact that you can market. It can help you move your shop away from lower-profit, highly competitive work.

The CNC router can handle all sorts of routine production tasks, like cutting panels, letter faces and drilling. It can also let you produce beautiful signs of all sizes in a fraction of the time it would take to do it by hand.

Here’s a gallery of signs that show the power and effectiveness of 3D. In every case, the sign maker took advantage of the efficiency of a CNC router to create a sign that gives their customers an edge in the marketplace.


Read this article and many more like it with a subscription to SignCraft.

Subscribe today for full access to all of our exclusive content!
- or -
New users get 7 days FREE — Register Now!