Rodger MacMunn
Sandblasted 48-by-71-in. Corafoam U150 15-lb. HDU panel, finished with Porter AcriShield exterior acrylic paint and 23K gold leaf on the lettering. “Donna drew the strawberries,” says Rodger, “I carved them, then Donna painted them. The texture behind the gold is done with Gorilla Glue, a trick I learned from Sal Cabrera.”
CNC-carved 38-by-24-in. Corafoam U150 15-lb. HDU board routed on a CAMaster Mini Cobra 3648 CNC router, finished with PPG Sun Proof exterior acrylic paint and 23k gold leaf.
CNC-carved 20-lb. HDU board done using Dan Sawatzky’s Texture Magic Woodgrain for the background texture. It’s finished with exterior acrylic paint; numerals are carved and finished with 23k gold leaf. Rodger painted the long-eared owl.
CNC-carved 15-lb. HDU board panel finished with exterior acrylic paint. Lettering is finished with W&B palladium leaf.
CNC- and hand-carved 15-lb. HDU panel, finished with acrylic house paint, on rough-sawn plank background.
Their truck is a digital print.
Hand-lettered on 40-in.-wide pine finished with Porter Acri-Shield exterior acrylic paint. “I call this a ‘sign-shelf,’” Rodger says. “They’re great for the man-cave.”
The late Bill Riedel was a friend of Rodger’s. Rodger noticed that Bill didn’t have a dimensional sign at his cabin in the Catskills, so he made one using Bill’s go-to script. Rodger did the pictorial.
Rodger carved the great gray owl that graces his shop sign. It’s 53-in. wide and 4-in. thick, carved from 15-lb. HDU board and finished with exterior acrylic paint.
The shop sign is a sandblasted 15-lb. HDU panel,12-by-5-ft. overall, finished with exterior acrylic paint. The lettering was carved from 15-lb. HDU board, finished with 23k gold leaf.
Sandblasted 32-by-35-in. panel of 15-lb. HDU board finished with acrylic house paint and 23k gold leaf over a Gorilla Glue texture on the letters. Donna did the pictorial.
CNC-carved 20-by-20-in. 15-lb. HDU board panel finished with acrylic house paint. Numerals are domed with Coastal Enterprises PB Resin and finished with 23k gold leaf.
CNC-carved 32-by-47-in. 15-lb. HDU board panel finished with acrylic house paint and 23k gold leaf; pictorial by Donna.
Sandblasted western red cedar finished with exterior acrylic paint
Rodger designed and built this sign, and Donna did the pictorial. “They wanted a dog and a cat together on the sign,” he says. “The kitty would have been lost beside the dog. After some headscratching, it occurred to me to put one on each side. They loved it.” Sandblasted 15-lb. HDU board panel finished with acrylic house paint. Letters are domed with Coastal Enterprises PB Resin and finished with 23k gold leaf.
The graphics were done with a paint mask on a 7-ft.-wide panel of ¾-in. Extira treated fiberboard. “The steel corners are both decorative and structural,” says Rodger, “and the blacksmith and anvil are plasma-cut steel. Tim is an awesome blacksmith who does all my steel brackets and inserts.”
Another of Rodger’s “sign shelves” that doubles as an entry sign in the customer’s office. The lettering is finished with 19k caplain gold leaf.
A look inside Rodger’s office/design room...
...and inside the shop.
Sandblasted 15-lb. HDU board finished with exterior acrylic paint and 23k gold leaf. Rodger did most of the pictorial; Donna added the owners’ daughter on the dock.
Sandblasted 28-by-22-in. western red cedar panel finished with exterior acrylic paint and acrylic house paint. The client is a beekeeper, so Donna’s pictorial featured a bee at work.

Notice: Undefined offset: 1 in /var/www/html/signcraft.com/wp-content/themes/blankslate/single.php on line 96

Notice: Undefined offset: 1 in /var/www/html/signcraft.com/wp-content/themes/blankslate/single.php on line 106

Rodger MacMunn

By SignCraft Magazine

Posted on Monday, July 2nd, 2018

Shop name:
T.R. MacMunn & Sons

Shop size: 732 sq. ft.

Staff:
Rodger and Sharon MacMunn

Age: 63

Graphics equipment:
Roland CAMM-1 Gs24
CAMaster Mini Cobra 3648 CNC router

Online:
www.trmacsigns.com
On Facebook as T.R. MacMunn and Sons
Sign making is my second career. Although I lettered my first truck at age 14, I had no one to learn from and absolutely no idea that one could go to school to learn sign painting. Had I met the late Bill Riedel 30 years earlier, I wonder where I’d be now?

Anyway, I went on to spend over two decades in the trucking industry. By 1996 I was completely fed up with that, so I sold out. I invested $10K in software, a plotter, some supplies and dove headlong into the sign business. My very first sale was new vinyl lettering on a small backlit face for $53, as I recall. One has to start somewhere.

I’m in a very rural part of Ontario, with a tourism-based economy, thanks to the several hundred freshwater lakes within a 100mile radius. I’m 22 miles from the nearest stoplight. I tell people that we’re so far out that we don’t get Saturday Night Live till Tuesday at 3. I work alone, with the help of Sharon, my wife, who keeps the books in order.

I quickly realized that to even exist, let alone thrive, I needed to find a product that I could sell beyond our local area. It wasn’t long until I was making sandblasted cedar signs for waterfront cottage owners, and the rest is history. Although most of my business still comes from within a 50-mile radius, I do get a few jobs in northern Ontario and beyond.

Hand-carved signs I love to design, hand-carve and paint. Although it took me a little while to get comfortable with CNC technology, I do enjoy tool-pathing as well. I still haven’t mastered 3D modeling and may never conquer it. Besides, I can do most of the things that I need carved faster by hand.

My absolute favorite carving work is hand carving a bird flying out of a scene, although most of those I do for myself. The cost is beyond what most people care to spend, but when customers see them in your shop, it sure gives you credibility. Often that’s all it takes to complete the sale. Since a lot of my work is for lakefront homes and cottages, birds and fish are pretty popular in the pictorials.

Creative collaboration I have no training in art, so I always farmed out any pictorials that were beyond my skill level. In 2003, Donna Larocque walked into my shop, portfolio in hand. Soon we were working together. Several years later, she opened her own shop, Donna Larocque’s Sign Shoppe, but we continued to take advantage of each other’s skillsets, and we still do.

Although technically competitors, it’s friendly competition, and together we can take on jobs that would otherwise be more than either could handle. We each do our own designs, but Donna does a lot of my pictorial work. In turn, I do much of her woodwork. (The dusty stuff!)

Pages: 1 2


Read this article and many more like it with a subscription to SignCraft.

Subscribe today for full access to all of our exclusive content!
- or -
New users get 7 days FREE — Register Now!