From the front on the left side, this rack holds full 4x8 sheets. On the right it holds smaller pieces up to 4 ft. in length. Down the side there are partitions that hold smaller sizes and pre-cut blanks.
This rack holds full 4x8s on the lower portion plus some 10-ft. sheets in the far right side. Narrower pieces up to 12-ft. long can be stored in the upper sections. I have another rack not pictured that holds sheet stock up to 14-ft. long.
For rolls of film that are too large for our racks, we use the square plastic hubs to stand them on end.
I built this 18-in.-wide, 36-in.-deep cabinet in one corner. It’s divided into four sections that hold sixteen 10-yard rolls up to 36-in. wide. Each section is made from 4-in. thin-wall PVC drainage pipe, 30-in. in length.

Wasting time, wasting materials, wasting money?

By Larry Elliott

Posted on Monday, July 2nd, 2018

For years I tried to “save money” by keeping scraps of every type of material we use. I looked at it like it was made of gold. To just pitch it in the trash bin wasn’t something that came easy. I suppose when you’re raised to make do with what you have, it puts a bug in the back of your mind to never waste anything. But sometimes these little saved pieces of materials can waste a lot more time than they’re worth.

I would cut a little bit off a 4×8 sheet and stick it back, thinking I would soon use it on a small job. But it seems that I seldom ever had a job that needed one of these odd sizes. By the end of each year I had a pile of these precious little scraps taking up room in my storage racks, or piled against the wall and creeping out into my workspace.

So I built more storage racks—until one day I realized I had racks full of scraps that were never the right size, or if they were the right size, they were the wrong materials.


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