Raymond Chapman, Belton, Texas: Routed on a ShopBot CNC router
Peter Poanessa, Keene Signworx, Swanzey, New Hampshire
David Hassan, Hassan Signs, Cohasset, Massachusetts: Routed on a Multicam CNC router
Peter Poanessa, Keene Signworx, Swanzey, New Hampshire
Raymond Chapman, Belton, Texas: Routed on a ShopBot CNC router
Two-inch-square steel stock welded to the roof brackets provide the structure for this 32-by-72-in. sign by Braun Bleamer, Jet Signs, Palmerton, Pennsylvania. After facing that with pressure-treated plywood and filling the sides with 2-by stock, the box was skinned with recycled pallet wood boards with barnwood for the sides. The top is capped with aluminum sheet.The letters were CNC-cut from ¾-in. PVC board faced with brushed aluminum vinyl film. The film was applied before routing with a down-cut bit, then the letters were sprayed with PPG automotive clear coat.
David Hassan, Hassan Signs, Cohasset, Massachusetts
Rob Estes, Brushstroke Signs, Paducah, Kentucky: Routed on a ShopBot CNC route
David Hassan, Hassan Signs, Cohasset, Massachusetts
Dennis Stanworth, Stanworth Signs, Walnut Creek, California: CNC-router cut PVC letters
David Hassan, Hassan Signs, Cohasset, Massachusetts

CNC routers mean new opportunities

By SignCraft Magazine

Posted on Saturday, August 29th, 2020

Sourcelist

These companies offer products for CNC sign production and reach sign pros through SignCraft:

CNC equipment

AXYZ
CAMaster Industries
Gerber Scientific Products
Industrial CNC
Laguna Tools
MultiCam
ShopBot
Vision Engraving & Routing Systems

CadCam software

Artclip 3D
Gerber Scientific Products
Vectric
Enroute
Type 3/TypeEdit

Texture and shape files:

Dan Sawatzky’s Texture Magic
Periandros Design
CNC routers have made 3D signs easier to produce and opened new markets for sign makers. Lobby signs and architectural signage can be done alongside creative 3D signs. Appealing panel shapes for flat signs can be cut in minutes, giving sign makers an easy upgrade to sell on lower end signs.

A recent survey of our readers tells us that more than one in four SignCraft readers own a CNC router. 52% do 3D signs, and 76% do dimensional letters. 34% offer architectural signs. The CNC router lets shops produce this work profitably in house. If their volume doesn’t yet justify buying the equipment, outsourcing lets a sign maker move into 3D markets and develop this aspect of their business. When the volume is there, the in-house equipment can be added.

New opportunities are there for upselling customers from flat to 3D, too. As more 3D signage appears around us, the added appeal of dimension gets the attention of more potential customers. 3D signs pack more impact, and customers experience that when they see examples in your shop’s display area.

“Up on the mezzanine next to my office,” says Braun Bleamer, Jet Signs, Palmerton, Pennsylvania, “is a big 3D sign that I did for First National Bank of Palmerton years ago. Everyone that walks in the shop says, ‘That’s just what I want!’ Even those who can’t afford it want that look. It’s always been that way.”


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