Swipe these ideas!

By SignCraft Magazine

Posted on Friday, December 15th, 2017

Let’s make that “Borrow these ideas!” So often, the spark of inspiration that you need to start a design comes from seeing the work of another creative sign designer. Here are eight great-looking, highly effective sign designs from the January/February issue of SignCraft magazine, done by the folks at Kingdom Productions.

Each one has at least one creative twist that might be just the starting point you need for your next design project. Flip through these photos to find some inspiration you can borrow.

Hank Pryor and his staff at Kingdom Productions do themed graphics for attractions—zoos, museums and theme parks—where strong visual appeal is the name of the game. Commercial signs can benefit from this same approach. You’ll see more of Hank’s work in the January/February 2018 issue of SignCraft.

In today’s market, where signs are often seen as a generic item, being able to offer creative ideas and solutions are the best way to set your sign business apart. Creative design gives you something of value to sell—something beyond just “letters on a board.”

Texture the letters. Again, since smooth, plain letters are the norm, adding texture to the letters will set a sign apart from the crowd.

Use cut-out outline layers. Cut-out letters always add appeal, but you can heighten that effect by adding an outline layer behind the letters.

Add a textured border. So maybe the budget isn’t there for full 3D, but a textured border may still be affordable and can add a lot of interest.

Put panels over panels. This is a great way to create the effect of dimension with flat lettering. Using another layer behind a panel lets you use color and dimension to push the lettering.

Try funky panel shapes. Panels always add interest, and a panel doesn’t have to be just a geometric shape. Try leaves or freeform shapes or fruit or who knows what.

Replace a character with an object. You have to be careful with this one so that the object—like this flower—really does read as the character it replaces. It’s cool when you can make it work, but it can be a real disaster when it doesn’t.

Blend the letters. This is easy to do and adds a lot. Most letters on most signs are just one color. But blending the primary copy makes it more interesting than the rest of the copy.

Disguise the background. Make the background look like anything but a sign background—weathered planks, a giant leaf or a train. And rather than make the letters fit neatly inside it, let a letter or two bump off the background.

You’ll find hundreds of ideas that will make your work easier and set your designs apart in SignCraft, in print and online. Subscribe today!