Cantilevered sign using 1/8-in. steel faces, brushed aluminum lettering, and a steel beam in lots of concrete.
A name for a new home, cut in 1/8-in. thick steel
The finish is a mix of dissolved real copper shreds mixed into muriatic acid, aged together until the copper dissolves. The concentrate is then added to water (only one teaspoon per quart of water). The result is an instant rust patina with a coppery fire when applied to mild steel, then clear coated.
Here’s my CNC plasma cutting table cutting at warp speed in the vacuum room.
Graphics were cut from 1/8-in. steel and have LED backlighting. I made two of these 30-ft. long signs, one for each side of building.
Steel cut face backed up with brushed copper. The edges are wrapped with steel to make it 2-in. thick.
Layered 1/8-in. steel cuts, painted and assembled
Dave Harwood

Signs of steel: plasma-cut graphics

By Dave Harwood

Posted on Thursday, October 24th, 2019

I was thirty-three years old when I started making signs. Prior to that, I had owned other businesses, but my background was in art, and I just wasn’t satisfied by owning an auto parts franchise! A friend of mine helped me get underway with sign making in 1993.

Since that time, things have changed a bit. I now subcontract most of the work that I used to do in house, leaving me the much-needed time to design signs, see customers, and actually create signs and art in a different way. I downsized my shop to 500 square feet, and am set up mostly for signs made of metal.

I live in Asheville, North Carolina, a small city that is all about the arts culture. My customers actually led me to start creating what they wanted most. Over the last ten years I’ve converted my business primarily to CNC plasma-cut lettering, logos, fully dimensional signs and art.


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